Maintenance Notice

Due to necessary scheduled maintenance, the JMIR Publications website will be unavailable from Monday, March 11, 2019 at 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM EST. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this may cause you.

Who will be affected?

Advertisement

Citing this Article

Right click to copy or hit: ctrl+c (cmd+c on mac)

Published on 27.10.15 in Vol 1, No 1 (2015): October

Preprints (earlier versions) of this paper are available at http://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/4694, first published May 14, 2015.

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

    Abstract

    Determining the Commercial Opportunity of a Skill-Based Mobile Application for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes:A Feasibility Test With Patients and Providers in a Healthcare Setting

    MicroMass Communications, Inc., Strategy, Cary, NC, United States

    *all authors contributed equally

    Corresponding Author:

    Jessica Brueggeman

    MicroMass Communications, Inc.

    Strategy

    100 Regency Forest Drive, Suite 400

    Cary, NC, 27518

    United States

    Phone: 1 919 256 2403

    Fax:1 919 851 3182

    Email:


    ABSTRACT

    Background: More than 29 million people in the U.S. live with diabetes. It is imperative to find solutions that empower and help patients build skills to better self-manage their disease independently in their daily lives. MicroMass Communications, Inc. will conduct a feasibility study to determine the acceptability and usability of Time 2 Focus, a type 2 diabetes mobile application (app). The app incorporates evidence-based behavioral techniques and leverages gamification principles to drive patients’ self-management behaviors. The experience guides patients through progressive skill-building activities related to real-world situations. Unlike current mobile apps for type 2 diabetes, Time 2 Focus goes beyond simple tracking and patient education. The app aims to improve patients’ confidence in their ability to carry out tasks, build problem-solving skills, and make better decisions—ultimately leading to better clinical outcomes.

    Objective: MicroMass has tested Time 2 Focus in a convenience sample of nine participants recruited from employer groups. To determine the acceptability and usability of the mobile app on a larger scale, MicroMass intends to conduct a feasibility study with FirstHealth of the Carolinas. FirstHealth serves a patient population that is disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes. The study aims to determine if a type 2 diabetes mobile app to improve problem-solving skills is feasible and acceptable to patients/healthcare providers, and the optimal way to integrate the app into the process of care.

    Methods: FirstHealth will identify a representative sample (n=600) of patients with type 2 diabetes from their existing electronic health record (EHR) system. These patients will be mailed a survey about type 2 diabetes self-management and mobile app use. MicroMass will invite participants to take part in interviews. The MicroMass research staff will conduct interviews with 6 to 12 patients and interviews with 6 to 12 healthcare providers who work with patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and healthcare providers will provide feedback on Time 2 Focus and how it could be implemented into the process of care.

    Results: Before the feasibility study, nine patients examined the usability of Time 2 Focus. From preliminary data, patients found Time 2 Focus to be helpful in managing their type 2 diabetes. Results from the feasibility study will direct next steps to help improve Time 2 Focus.

    Conclusions: Solutions that can easily be integrated into the existing process of care and meet the needs of patients with type 2 diabetes are needed. The intent in developing and testing the feasibility of Time 2 Focus is to make the app commercially available to health systems as a cost-effective, scalable, and wide-reaching solution to improve clinical outcomes.

    iProc 2015;1(1):e10

    doi:10.2196/iproc.4694

    KEYWORDS


    (This is a conference paper presented at the Connected Health Symposium, Boston, 2015, which was not edited and is only lightly peer-reviewed).

    Multimedia Appendix 1

    Extended abstract.

    PDF File (Adobe PDF File), 774KB

    References

      Edited by G Eysenbach, T Hale; submitted 14.05.15; peer-reviewed by D Bibeau, T Keyser, B Barnes; comments to author 18.06.15; accepted 20.07.15; published 27.10.15

      ©Jessica Brueggeman, Rob Peters, Neala Havener. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://www.iproc.org), 27.10.2015.

      This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.