Evaluation of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Among Hospital Pharmacists-Mansoura, Egypt, 2016-Cross Sectional Survey

Evaluation of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Among Hospital Pharmacists-Mansoura, Egypt, 2016-Cross Sectional Survey

Evaluation of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Among Hospital Pharmacists-Mansoura, Egypt, 2016-Cross Sectional Survey

Abstract

Corresponding Author:

Mohamed El-sayed Abdel-Aziz Abdel-Aty


Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of drug related morbidity and mortality. Globally, about 5% of all hospital admissions are due to an ADR and 10%-20% of inpatients have at least one ADR during their hospitalization. Pharmacovigilance is the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem(s).

Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, practice and attitudes (KAP) toward ADRs reporting and pharmacovigilance among hospital pharmacists in Mansoura, Egypt, 2016.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among random sample of hospital pharmacists in Mansoura, who were invited to attend a workshop on Pharmacovigilance. A structured pilot tested questionnaire was developed based on the previous literature. The questionnaire was distributed to the attending pharmacists before and after the workshop. Collected data was analyzed using SPSS v.16.0.

Results: Of the total 200 invited pharmacists, 95% attended and agreed to participate in the study. The majority were females (87%), with mean age 30.6±4.2 years. Before the workshop, the average percentage of correct answers on the knowledge items was 55% indicating a fair to poor score which had been enhanced after the workshop (90%). The majority of pharmacists had positive attitude toward Pharmacovigilance and agreed that ADRs reporting should be mandatory, prompt and online but without legal penalties on the reporter. According to their practice, the most reported ADRs were severe serious reaction (22.5%), unexpected reaction (21.5%) and unlabeled reaction (17.5%). Besides, the most barriers to ADRs reporting were uncertainty whether the reaction is actually due to ADR (25%), already well-Known ADR (15.5%) and forgetfulness (14.5%).

Conclusions: Awareness campaigns, incorporation of pharmacovigilance in health education, mandatory online ADRs reporting system will greatly enhance implementation of pharmacovigilance in Egypt.

iproc 2018;4(1):e10610

doi:10.2196/10610


Edited by Y Khader; This is a non–peer-reviewed article. submitted 29.03.18; accepted 29.03.18; published 29.03.18

Copyright

©Mohamed El-sayed Abdel-Aziz Abdel-Aty. Originally published in Iproceedings (http://www.iproc.org), 29.03.2018.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in Iproceedings, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.iproc.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.